BY Russell Wardrop

DATE: 14 DEC 2011

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It’s the famous Grand Hotel, Brighton. In the afternoon I’m delivering three hours to about 100, but I have the morning to myself.  After breakfast I was “caught” by the client in the foyer, on my way out for a morning run along the Prom at a time I thought they would all be in the conference room. Four senior people, including the new partner in charge, were at the foot of the stairs as I came down in my shorts: thankfully everything was clean and colour co-ordinated. Thankfully, too, I’ve lost a bit of weight in the past few months and am looking less chunky. Dark colours helped. You just never know who you might meet…

9am to 10am

I permitted myself a late, leisurely breakfast after half an hour of exercise in my room. It was too wild at 8am to go out running along the prom as I had intended.

10am to 11am

Answered some emails, caught up with some other bits and pieces, watched a bit of Homes Under The Hammer, scoped out the presentation on an A4 sheet.

11am to 12 noon

By late morning the weather had cleared and, with no risk of being blown onto the beach, I went out for a run along Brighton sea-front. The order I was going to deliver the material in, as per the sheet, was in my mind. Ideally, to spice things up, I was looking for a new opening story: Duran Duran (playing in the theatre next door), The Iron Lady (film just out), public sector strikes (on the news), David Narey (I was wearing a new T shirt with his famous goal against Brazil featured), the 1980s (my era...) and the Grand Hotel (where I was staying) were all ideas in my head. Good ideas, they were, but I had no theme...

That was where I met my clients. After I’d got over the shock I asked him if he could put it up when I was introduced that afternoon. One way or another I could use it, though I was unsure how.

The story came together as I walked along the pier, and it was all about the photograph. With that behind me on a big screen, the crux would be that in the 80s we couldn’t have put the photo up on a screen: no-one would have had their own camera, and even if they did the technology did not exist to ping it by email, or use a memory stick. And the “moral” would be that while technology had changed a lot in a few decades the seven principles of relationship management have not. Bingo! The last part of my run was devoted to working up my opening.

Showered, suited and booted I go down for lunch and, after Lamb Tagine and Lemon Meringue Pie, we are good to go.

Of course, the best laid plans and all that. The photo never appeared when I was introduced by the conference chair. So, never be surprised when the technology does not work. It was no big deal, as I told the story about the photo without the photo of me in my shorts. And as an added bonus a young tech-wizzard used the coffee break to put me up, larger than life, on the big screen: this worked very well as we were looking at the necessity to “Be Appropriately Memorable” in your networks.
 So, never be surprised when the technology does not work. It was no big deal, as I told the story about the photo without the photo of me in my shorts. And as an added bonus a young tech-wizzard used the coffee break to put me up, larger than life, on the big screen: this worked very well as we were looking at the necessity to “Be Appropriately Memorable” in your networks.

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about the author

Russell Wardrop is our Chief Executive. If you would like to know more about this subject, drop him an email and we will be in touch.

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